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    • Sarcomastigophora

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Creative Commons Flickr Photos Tagged "Sarcomastigophora."

Recent observations

Photos / Sounds

Observer

lamamark

Date

January 20, 2006

Description

tentative ID

Photos / Sounds

Observer

lamamark

Date

January 18, 2006

Description

Spyridae or Plagoniidae

Photos / Sounds

Observer

lamamark

Date

January 24, 2006

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

lamamark

Date

January 18, 2006

Description

Plagoniidae or Theoperidae

Photos / Sounds

Observer

damontighe

Date

September 17, 2016 05:56 PM PDT

Tags

Photos / Sounds

Observer

damontighe

Date

September 23, 2016 01:50 PM PDT

Description

Images taken with Bio-Rad ZOE imager

Tags

Photos / Sounds

Observer

damontighe

Date

September 23, 2016 03:01 PM PDT

Tags

Photos / Sounds

Observer

damontighe

Date

August 25, 2016 08:45 PM PDT

Description

Sample from 20th st storm drain barrier in lake merritt, which has been unusually stinky over the past month as if sewage or something very nutrient rich has been flowing down this pipe. I've never seen these large filamentous mats before at lake merritt in recent years. All images takewith Bio-Rad's ZOE fluorescent imager

Tags

Photos / Sounds

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Observer

milisenj

Date

April 3, 2015

Photos / Sounds

Square

Observer

juancruzado

Date

May 18, 2015

Description

Trichomonas gallinae

T. gallinae is generally found in the oral-nasal cavity or anterior end of the digestive and respiratory tracts. The trichomonads multiply rapidly by simple division (binary fission), but do not form a resistant cyst. They therefore die quickly when passed out of the host

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Description from Wikipedia

The phylum Sarcomastigophora belongs to the Protist kingdom and it includes many unicellular or colonial, autotrophic, or heterotrophic organisms.

No range data available.
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